Anti-optogenetics 2

September 7th, 2013 § 0 comments

This is a response to John Horgan’s response to the responses to his original anti-optogenetics-hype article what I blogged about. The comments section is worth reading, but I thought I’d respond to a couple of points here, too.

Neuroscientist Richard Tomsett says one of my examples of hype—a TED talk by Ed Boyden, another leader of optogenetics—doesn’t count because “the whole point of such talks is hype and speculation.” Really? So scientists shouldn’t be criticized for hyping their research in mass-media venues like TED—which reaches gigantic audiences–because no one is taking them seriously? Surely that can’t be right.

I perhaps wasn’t clear enough here – my point was that it seemed silly to refer to a TED talk as an example of hype when all TED talks hype their particular topics. Scientists certainly should be criticised for hyping research, but this is a problem with the TED format rather than optogenetics.

…the abysmal state of health care in the U.S. should have a bearing on discussions about biomedical research. I’m not saying that journalists, every time they report on a biomedical advance, need to analyze its potential impact on our health-care problems. But knowledge of these woes should inform coverage of biomedical advances, especially since technological innovation is arguably contributing to our high health care costs.

I agree, but again this is not a problem with optogenetics, or even the scientists that try to hype it.

John’s posts touch on an issue with the way that science is funded, which (in the UK at least, and I assume elsewhere) requires an “impact” assessment to try to ensure that research spending isn’t a waste of money. This is a big problem because it can be very difficult to predict what impact most research will have in the short term, let alone the long term. The most obvious way to demonstrate “impact” in neuroscience is to refer to potential treatments for brain disorders, though such treatments might be years or decades away. The brain is so complex that it’s impossible to predict how a particular piece of research might impact medical practice, but you are compelled to spin your case because of this demand for “impact” – hence why all neuroscience press-releases will refer to potential treatments, no matter how relevant the research is to medicine. I completely agree that if scientists want to justify receiving public money then they need to justify their research to the public, but the current incentives promote hype – particularly medical hype. Note that I don’t offer a solution to this problem…

As I said in the previous post, there are good points to be made about the hype surrounding optogenetics (as in this post), it’s just unfortunate that John instead went for criticisms that could be leveled at any hyped science. Rather than attacking a particular field with some quite shaky points, it would have been much more interesting to address why scientists feel the need to hype their work in the first place.

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