Consciousness, memory, booze

I was having a read of Neuroskeptic‘s interview with Dr Srivas Chennu on PLOS Neuro earlier (recommended), and found myself nodding vigorously in agreement on reading this quotation:

Consciousness is not just being aware of something, but also being aware that you were aware of it yesterday.

I don’t read too much about consciousness research, but I find sometimes that consciousness researchers neglect the crucial aspect of memory. It is quite possible to appear to be conscious (moving, responding to stimuli, holding conversations) without storing memories. Consider becoming black-out drunk. If you’ve never done this, I wouldn’t necessarily recommend it (unless you are a consciousness researcher, in which case it’s completely essential research), but it is interesting from a philosophical perspective. At some point during an evening of drinking, you completely cease forming memories, but your behaviour is not dramatically different from your usual drunken antics. Are you conscious during this period?

What about when you were an infant and unable to form longer-term memories, were you conscious then? No one can remember, so you can’t just ask someone “were you conscious when you were 3 months old?” – but most people can answer affirmatively if you ask “were you conscious when you were 6 years old?” even if they’ve forgotten much of what they did at age 6.

One of the current popular theories of consciousness, integrated information theory (IIT), doesn’t take into account memory (Scott Aaronson’s detailed post on IIT is great). It does many other strange things like predicting small amounts of consciousness for items that intuitively would not be conscious in any way, but I suppose this just helps to show that whether something is conscious or not is determinable only by the something itself. If it can remember(?). Medical consciousness researchers have got their work cut out for them.